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Lichen Striatus

Lichen Striatus1

Lichen Striatus2

General Information
Lichen Striatus is a self-limited linear rash appearing often on an extremity. The small papules, which may be smooth, scaly or flat topped are red, tan or the same color of the flesh. Lichen Straitus is usually asymptomatic; the most common complaint with patients is pruritus. The eruption normally grows over a few days to weeks. The cause of Lichen Straitus is unknown but researchers hypothesize that it is a genetic predisposition (atopic dermatitis, asthma, or allergic rhinitis) with environmental stimuli. Lichen Straitus is not contagious. The condition will normally resolve itself around 3 – 12 months, but some medications may be given to patients to treat any associated pruritus or dryness of the skin. Medications include emollients and topical steroids.

Epidemiology
Occurs more often in children aged 5-15

Etiology
Unknown; most accepted hypothesis is the combination of genetic predisposition with environmental stimuli

Pathogenesis
Small eruption of small papules

Clinical
Appears as a linear band consisting of small pink, tan or skin colored papules

Histology
Polymorphic epidermal reaction pattern with variable spongiotic and lichenoid changes

Bibliography
1. “Lichen Striatus” (Online). September 2006. http://www.emedicine.com/DERM/topic238.htm (visited: March 24, 2008) 2. “Lichen Striatus” (Online). http://www.aocd.org/skin/dermatologic_diseases/lichen_striatus.html (visited: March 24, 2008)

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