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Mycosis Fungoides

Mycosis Fungoides1

Mycosis Fungoides2

General Information
Mycosis Fungoides is a form of malignancy characterized by red scaly patches that develop into raised plaques, some patients will have pruritus. The plaques eventually turn into mushroom-shaped tumors. Mycosis Fungoides is the most common type of Cutaneous T-cell Lymphoma (CTCL), originating from a type of white blood cell called a T lymphocyte or T cell. MF is a malignant lymphoma. Diagnosing MF at first may be difficult because it resembles a variety of other type of skin diseases including eczema or psoriases. Several biopsies are recommended, to be certain of the diagnosis. A diagnosis may also be possible through examination of noncutaneous sites including the lymph nodes or blood. Treatment is aimed at controlling symptoms, improving quality of life, and preventing progression of the disease. It responds well to a variety of therapy and treatments and frequently goes into remission, particularly if caught at an early stage. Common treatments include sunlight, ultraviolet light, topical steroids, topical and systemic chemotherapies, local superficial radiotherapy, total skin electron beam radiation, and biological therapies. Some treatments often are used in combinations with others. The selection of treatment is based on the stage of the cancer and prior treatment history.

Epidemiology
Approximately 1000 new cases per year

Etiology
Unknown, Environmental chemicals, virus infections, genes and allergies have been suggested

Pathogenesis
Symptoms begin as rash like patches, plaques, tumors or erythroderma

Clinical
Red scaly patches that develop into raised plaques, then into mushroom-shaped tumors

Histology
Bandlike upper dermal infiltrate of lymphocytes and other inflammatory cells, with no grenz zone, is present; little spoingiosis is found on the epidermis. Lymphocytes have nuclei that are hyperchromatic and convoluted or cerebriform.

Bibliography
1. “Mycosis Fungoides” (Online) June 2006. http://www.emedicine.com/med/topic1541.htm (visited: March 25, 2008) 2. “Mycosis Fungoides” (Online). http://www.healthline.com/galecontent/mycosis-fungoides#definition (visited: March 25, 2008)

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